Thu, 9th Oct — 332 notes
punio:

My last poster.
Thu, 9th Oct — 348 notes
solarsisterss:

PROTECT EACH OTHER AT ALL COSTS
Thu, 9th Oct — 2,848 notes

fatmankey

Thu, 9th Oct — 0 notes

dinuguan:

Alice Glass is going back to This American Life with her brother, Ira.

Thu, 9th Oct — 7 notes
20aliens:

10425 Venice Boulevard - Los Angeles, May 18, 1997by John Humble
Thu, 9th Oct — 12,729 notes

Thu, 9th Oct — 556 notes
Wed, 8th Oct — 107,617 notes
brookehatfield:

this vivian maier-esque flannery o’connor selfie is from this video about the DADGUM TREASURE TROVE from flannery o’connor’s estate that emory just acquired. 

Among them are early short stories; charming juvenilia, including a hand-lettered children’s book about a goose; rarely seen photographs, including a self-portrait in a mirror, with an enigmatic hint of a smile; and a journal begun in December 1943 and titled “Higher Mathematics,” which wryly reveals Ms. O’Connor’s early acknowledgment of her formidable gifts.
“It is a pity I can’t receive my own letters,” she wrote in a journal entry dated Jan. 22, 1944. “If they produce as much wholehearted approval at their destination as they do at their source, they should indeed be able to keep my memory alive and healthy.”

also featured in this video: dynamite poet kevin young, who’s a curator and professor at emory. THIS IS LIKE CHRISTMAS DAY 
Wed, 8th Oct — 4 notes
For three decades, Mr. McNally has been rooting around in the same Lego kit: distressed mirrors, chipped subway tiles, bottles backlighted to look like stained glass. In his hands, these well-worn tricks give restaurants the battered nobility of a vintage Saab. When anyone else tries, they end up with a 1986 Ford Escort. Sets and lighting will never be the whole show.
Thu, 2nd Oct — 0 notes
Mon, 29th Sep — 1,294 notes
tanku:

why is there ham on this cat
Mon, 29th Sep — 68,822 notes
Porsche 911 Carrera Makes Shift Work Wonderful

The 911 with a stick accelerates from 0 to 60 in 4.6 seconds; with the PDK, that number is as low as 4.2 seconds (with the Sport Chrono package). A difference of four-tenths, officially! If you were a German transmission engineer and you were four-tenths of a second slower getting to the coffee pot in the morning they would bin you.

And yet there it is: I want, I would only have, the seven-speed manual transmission. First, because those few tenths at 100% throttle are not actually that important to me and I, personally, would never track my daily driver. Second, because Porsche’s seven-speed shifter is turned out so beautifully, with lustrous aluminum and taut leather, surrounded by a glove-soft leather gusset in the center console, almost steampunk in its elegant antiquation. Third, it’s a mechanical marvel: The weight, throw and uptake of the clutch pedal, the frictionless linkages, the gate-homing precision of the shifter, all impeccable, all to the sound of an upscale lumber mill.

To feather the clutch lightly up a hill, to rev impetuously and dump the clutch when the floodlights hit. Stop, thief! You’ve stolen our hearts.

But it’s mostly because when you’re good at something—a language, an instrument, or in my limited case, heel-and-toe downshifting—there’s joy in doing it. A couple of mornings I caught myself skipping out to the car.

Dan Neil

Sun, 28th Sep — 1 note
What Will Ferrari Be After Luca Cordero di Montezemolo Leaves?

The trouble is, Mr. Montezemolo has spent his career at Ferrari—every time I have ever talked to the man, as far back as 1993—arguing the opposite course. Sell, sell, sell, but restrain production, increase rarity and exclusivity, raise residuals and, above all, protect the brand, even if that means leaving money on the table. His near-term plan actually called for lowering production numbers. I guess he finally lost that argument. Ruthless capitalists would see nothing amiss here. “It’s the same for him as it is for me,” Mr. Marchionne said last week. “We serve the company. When the company has a change of plans, or if there is no longer a convergence of ideas, things change.”

Except that executives aren’t always interchangeable. This is what market materialists never get. Setting aside his record, Mr. Montezemolo represents an unbroken chain of succession from Enzo, the living embodiment, the patrimony. European manufacturing concerns, particularly Italian companies, are often cults of male personality. Mr. Montezemolo—vulpine, mahogany-skinned, elegant—played the role perfectly.

And not all brands are fungible. Indeed, a key part of Ferrari’s mythology has been its independence, its gallant disregard of best business practices in the name of global sport. From the earliest days under Enzo, the company spent more money on racing than American accountants would probably think wise. Ferrari does most of its design and manufacturing in-house, in Maranello. The efficiency experts in Turin will likely want to change some of that, too.

Mr. Montezemolo has loudly and repeatedly refused to consider a Ferrari sport-ute/crossover vehicle. Enzo would turn over in his grave, and so on. But what will tomorrow bring now that Mr. Marchionne has direct control? Will the Formula One pit crews be issued red sweaters?

Dan Neil

Sun, 28th Sep — 0 notes
Fri, 26th Sep — 0 notes